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Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Getting away with murder

Even on the rare occasions the police are ever charged with murder after killing someone, they get away with it:
Two California police officers who were videotaped in a violent struggle with a homeless man during an arrest were acquitted Monday of killing him. It was a rare case in which police officers were charged in a death involving actions on duty....

The video began with Ramos stopping Thomas on July 5, 2011, after the officer answered a call about a disheveled man jiggling the handles of car doors in a busy transit center parking lot. Ramos grew frustrated with Thomas, who wasn't following orders to sit on a curb with his hands on his knees.

Just before the altercation began, Ramos snapped on plastic gloves, made two fists and then held them in front of Thomas' face as he said, "Now see these fists? They're going to (expletive) you up."

Cicinelli, who arrived a few moments later, jolted Thomas several times with an electric stun gun and used the butt end to hit Thomas in the head and face, breaking bones.

Thomas was taken off life support five days later.
Well, that settles it. If the police are involved, you will get no justice from the legal system. It's not as if this is a one-time event. It is dangerous to even call the police for help.
A Boiling Springs Lakes, North Carolina family is looking for answers after local police shot and killed their mentally ill teenage son while responding to a call for help....Wilsey said that Vidal had been subdued until the third officer walked in and the boy became agitated.

"Then all of a sudden, this Southport cop came, walked in the house [and said]: 'I don't have time for this. Tase him. Let's get him out of here,'" Wilsey told NBC. After the stun gun was used on Vidal, Wilsey said the third officer shot him, saying he was protecting his officers.

"He reached right up, shot this kid point-blank, with all intent to kill," Wilsey added. "He just murdered him flat out."
It is increasingly looking as if the police in America have declared war on the mentally disturbed.

Labels:

84 Comments:

Anonymous Steveo January 14, 2014 4:14 PM  

Blue perps.

Anonymous Huckleberry - est. 1977 January 14, 2014 4:16 PM  

Local news channel here in LA had a live twitter feed with viewer reactions -- all against the police. The one that said "there's a war coming for the LAPD" made them cut away quickly to weather.
I wish I could have gotten a screen grab, but I was at the gym.
This is 180 degrees away from the reaction following the Rodney King beating.
Times have changed, there's an undercurrent brewing, and I wouldn't want to be a cop, or even know one right now.
Thankfully, I'm good on both counts.

Blogger Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus January 14, 2014 4:17 PM  

It is increasingly looking as if the police in America have declared war on the mentally disturbed.

Oh and, by the way, we're defining anyone who disagrees with the government as "mentally disturbed."

/guess who

Blogger Miguel D'Anconia January 14, 2014 4:21 PM  

It makes you wonder when people will strike back and declare open season on the criminals in blue like this? Any one who puts any stock in "The Oath Keepers" is a fool.

Blogger swiftfoxmark2 January 14, 2014 4:23 PM  

They haven't declared war on the disabled. They are just looking for weak targets to bully.

Most police brutality cases usually involve women, the elderly, or the handicap. This is because bullies do not dare take on potentially dangerous people, such as young men who probably weigh the same as them, but without the protruding gut.

Anonymous Huckleberry - est. 1977 January 14, 2014 4:31 PM  

The city of Rialto, after numerous complaints, mandated that every officer be fitted with a camera and audio recording unit for patrol.
Reports of abuse, violence and harassment dropped 88% in a year.
That the city mandated this policy is in itself a miracle, but understanding since lawsuits were taking a huge financial toll on cash-strapped coffers.
As more cities near insolvency, this may become a growing trend.

Anonymous Josh January 14, 2014 4:36 PM  

The city of Rialto, after numerous complaints, mandated that every officer be fitted with a camera and audio recording unit for patrol.
Reports of abuse, violence and harassment dropped 88% in a year.


I'm wondering how successful a gubernatorial run would be with this a the single issue.

Anonymous Too-Soon-ami January 14, 2014 4:36 PM  

Huckleberry: This is 180 degrees away from the reaction following the Rodney King beating.

Kelly Thomas is about 180 degrees different from Rodney King.

Blogger Bob Wallace January 14, 2014 4:39 PM  

The police weren't like this when I was a kid...says everyone who knew them when they were Peace Officers, not Police Officers.

And someone like Jason Dorner would not have cleared the streets of them, as he make them do in California.

Anonymous Maximo Macaroni January 14, 2014 4:45 PM  

There is a dilemma here. Someone bad enough to protect you from your worst enemy is bad enough to hurt you, too. Quis custodiet ipsos custodies? But what do you do? How many empires have been done down by the barbarians they let into their armies?

And I wonder at how many people who weren't there jump to the offensive against the police. I have learned not to commit myself if I wasn't there. There may always be one more inconvenient fact that can make the situation look totally different. Although I will say in this case that appears unlikely.

Anonymous aero January 14, 2014 4:48 PM  

The police know how to work the legal system. And so do all the two bit criminals. That know how to keep their mouth shut. They also know that most police do not know how to gather evidence. The more time it takes to get a court trial the better your chances are of off.

Anonymous Huckleberry - est. 1977 January 14, 2014 4:52 PM  

Kelly Thomas is about 180 degrees different from Rodney King

Yeah, Rodney King had a job, a car and a home, Kelly Thomas didn't.

Anonymous Huckleberry - est. 1977 January 14, 2014 4:54 PM  

they probably make up .01% of the public's interaction with police

I'm going to need to see the data on that please.

Anonymous Cederq January 14, 2014 4:55 PM  

Truth, cite your facts and suppositions, in other words put up or shut up.

Blogger swiftfoxmark2 January 14, 2014 4:56 PM  

There's probably one dirty cop or judge per every couple of hundred. Cops are part of the population and subject to the same bad apples. As far as Vox's horror stories, they probably make up .01% of the public's interaction with police. Vox is a liar.

You ever been to CopBlock? How about checking the Police Misconduct feed?

How about the simple matter that these officers beat a man to death whose only crime was an inability to properly comply with the officer's requests.

How about you go to the kiddy table. The adults are having a serious conversation here.

Anonymous Giraffe January 14, 2014 4:58 PM  

Harrassment of law abiding gun owner in Maryland.

Anonymous Dan in Tx January 14, 2014 4:59 PM  

We were having a discussion this morning along these same lines. I hope they never get the wrong house and kick my door in by mistake because I have already set in my mind to defend myself. They have made it clear that even if you are unarmed and do not resist they are just as likely to open up on you anyway.

Blogger Nate January 14, 2014 5:06 PM  

"There's probably one dirty cop or judge per every couple of hundred. Cops are part of the population and subject to the same bad apples. As far as Vox's horror stories, they probably make up .01% of the public's interaction with police. Vox is a liar."

Bye Truth.

Anonymous Gapeseed January 14, 2014 5:07 PM  

Although not as important as the taking of a human life, let's not forget all the dogs shot for being dogs. And not just guardian breeds like pit bulls and German Shepherds, but gentle and small breeds who would just as soon lick you to death as anything else.

Anonymous map January 14, 2014 5:13 PM  

How many of these are minority officers?

Blogger Peregrine John January 14, 2014 5:20 PM  

Ramos and Cicinelli. Make of those what you will.

Anonymous Porky January 14, 2014 5:21 PM  

Three cops beat a homeless guy for ten minutes straight until he chokes on his own blood.

And a jury cannot agree that this is 'excessive force'.

There is a problem, ladies and gentlemen. And it ain't the police.

Anonymous allyn71 January 14, 2014 5:23 PM  

"Although not as important as the taking of a human life, let's not forget all the dogs shot for being dogs." - Gapeseed January 14, 2014 5:07 PM

I have said here before that a good metric for evaluating your local police force is the puppycide metric. If they have adopted the practice, avoid contact under pain of death. If they aren't shooting the pooches for "Officer Safety" in your area yet, you might still be able to safely interact with them in a limited way.

Blogger Peregrine John January 14, 2014 5:24 PM  

Note also that due to a law pushed into being by the police union, the contents of the files on their actions - which led to their firing, let's not forget - were not allowed to be included in the case.

Anonymous David of One January 14, 2014 5:25 PM  

The case in California involving the murder of Thomas is particular heinous in that there was 30 minutes or so of video starting out with the true threat of a beating which then was carried out ... all captured on video. Additionally, the Coroner was clearly involved because of providing an extenuating circumstance as to an enlarged heart due to drug use as being contributory to the victim's death. So a normal and healthy person, with no history of drug use, could more easily survive 30 minutes of beating, torture and repeated electrocution.

It also proves, yet again, that a dead victim is not as much a threat as a live one. Another major reason to be skeptical of anything the medical community has to say about "brain death" if there is a chance that they are complicit in covering up a murder by the local police.

What's more, during the profound beating and torture of this individual he was repeatedly calling out for help from his father.

I'd definitely be curious as to the Judge's "instructions" to the jurors.

Anonymous AlteredFate January 14, 2014 5:34 PM  

I wonder if Truth is one of the usual suspects or if he was just recently assigned to attempts at derailing VP. Why can't the police accidentally beat to death some of these ankle biting rabbits? Certainly enough of 'em.

Blogger ajw308 January 14, 2014 5:42 PM  

The girl's dad must have been resisting.

Blogger Marissa January 14, 2014 6:09 PM  

Three cops beat a homeless guy for ten minutes straight until he chokes on his own blood.

And a jury cannot agree that this is 'excessive force'.

There is a problem, ladies and gentlemen. And it ain't the police.


I especially love the part about how the paramedics first on the scene tended to some minor injuries to one of the officers (one gets a little hurt beating a man to death) and finally tended to Thomas when he realized the man was lying in a pool of his blood.

Anonymous Porky January 14, 2014 6:16 PM  

The Police dept. actually had the sense to fire the guys for using too much force.

Strangely, twelve jurors could not reach the same conclusion.


Anonymous Phil Mann January 14, 2014 6:17 PM  

I doubt the judge's instructions played much of a role here. I have tried more than a few cases to juries and it is almost an in joke among lawyers how little effect instructions actually have.

The real problem is that a significant segment exists among our fellow countrymen that likes the idea that certain men, preferably working for the government, are able to walk around and kill at will. (What made James Bond's "00" license so iconic?) The trouble starts when one or more of these warped individuals survives voir dire and gets empaneled as a juror.

In a very real sense, these jury verdicts are simply a reflection of who we are as a people. We really do not like each other very much, and if someone is blatantly murdered by a cop, chances are there is at least one person out of twelve who will figure the victim had it coming. All it takes is one to hang a jury at best, or force an acquittal at worst.

Anonymous Ridip January 14, 2014 6:17 PM  

Truth has already been decried as bullshit, but for anyone who still holds the police in some regard I had an excellent book called COPS I believe that was recommended to me by one of the rare good ones. True stories from cops mouths about the stuff they pull, the laws they break and the messes their families are. Be warned, you may have to trudge through a lot of gay cop porn on Amazon to find it

Anonymous Huckleberry - est. 1977 January 14, 2014 6:27 PM  

The Police dept. actually had the sense to fire the guys for using too much force

Yes, but only after the three City of Fullerton council members were recalled because the city initially refused to do anything. After the recall, the city's residents then demanded the firings of the officers, along with the resignation of the police chief.
They eventually got all of it, but none of it would have happened had the beating not been recorded.

Anonymous Idle Spectator January 14, 2014 7:06 PM  

Be warned, you may have to trudge through a lot of gay cop porn on Amazon to find it

Sounds hot.

It is increasingly looking as if the police in America have declared war on the mentally disturbed.

In The Know: Is The Government Spying On Schizophrenics Enough?

Blogger JCclimber January 14, 2014 7:09 PM  

One of the things that made Dorner so effective was that he turned the tables on the bullies in blue.

They're used to forcing people to comply out of fear: fear of losing their family, fear of going to jail, fear of being falsely accused, fear of the guns.

He killed family of cops, revealing to EVERYONE how easy it is to strike back at the police force where they are weakest, and revealing the massive fear overreaction.

I wonder how many took note of this in the general population.

Anonymous kfg January 14, 2014 7:15 PM  

"There's probably one dirty cop or judge per every couple of hundred."

The police are marching, in platoon strength, down my quiet, colonial era, residential street, chanting:

"Issue me an M-16. Now I am a shooting machine."

Anonymous Godfrey January 14, 2014 7:25 PM  

I wasn't on the jury, but if they were wrong in their verdict, the disgraced jurors should shunned by the community.

Anonymous Godfrey January 14, 2014 7:34 PM  

The video is sickening. The jurors are a disgrace to humanity.

Anonymous Bobo January 14, 2014 7:38 PM  

"Someone bad enough to protect you from your worst enemy... "

Are you outta your rabbit-assed mind?

Anonymous zen0 January 14, 2014 7:39 PM  

The video is sickening. The jurors are a disgrace to humanity.

I think an investigation for jury tampering is in order here.

Anonymous Anonymous January 14, 2014 7:41 PM  

was it a conservative jury? or a liberal jury?

who likely let these dogs off. the answer might surprise you.

Anonymous Laz January 14, 2014 7:43 PM  

Ban cops!

Anonymous bob k. mando January 14, 2014 7:44 PM  

just posting for Truth and other prospective Truthians out there, since his post has already been deleted:
http://voxday.blogspot.com/2009/01/rules-of-blog_01.html
"6. You will not call me a liar without providing any evidence of my lying, nor will you attempt to attribute to me words I have not written or actions I have not performed. If you do, your comments will be deleted and you will probably be banned. "


now that i read it, i also see that Taylor actually violated rule 6 herself when she threatened to out Nate to his community and church.

"A similar consequence will meet any attempts to "out" me or any other individual commenting here"


i'm assuming that 'out' in this context means revealing webspace persona to meatspace and vice versa although i'm aware that it could be construed as accusing someone of being queer .... which we do all the time around here so somebody got some splainin to do if that's the case.

i actually don't like that subrule being included in rule 6. going full Adria deserves it's own specific rule, methinks.

Anonymous Godfrey January 14, 2014 7:54 PM  

@Anonymous January 14, 2014 7:41 PM
"was it a conservative jury? or a liberal jury? ...who likely let these dogs off. the answer might surprise you."


Good question. I would speculate that it would be the "U-S-A, U-S-A, U-S-A" types. The same type of people that support water-boarding.

Anonymous Rick Johnsmeyer January 14, 2014 8:07 PM  

What's interesting is the US in 2013 had the fewest police officers murdered in the line of duty since at least the late 1800's - and those are raw numbers, not adjusted per capita. 31 died by gunfire, 1 was stabbed, and another 3 or 4 were intentionally run down by people in cars (as opposed to a death from being hit by a DUII driver).

30 years earlier - in a less-populous America - there were 81 officers murdered by gunfire, 8 were stabbed to death, 3 were beaten/assaulted to death, and 10 were intentionally run over.

Far fewer police officers (especially per capita) in the US are dying at the hands of angry or murderous members of the public than used to be the case.

You could certainly argue that aggressive, puppy-shooting, expletive-spewing, SWAT-style policing works a lot better than the old methods, in terms of protecting the lives of those who work as police officers.

Maybe Americans and American society simply require "the pimp hand," as it were, to keep people in line. Anything less leads to disorder and spiraling rates of crimes like murder, as we saw from the mid-1960's right through the early 90's.

Blogger LP 999/Eliza January 14, 2014 8:16 PM  

Shock, misery, death.

Anonymous cherub's revenge January 14, 2014 8:18 PM  

Bob Wallace

The police weren't like this when I was a kid...


No and anyone can confirm it if they get a chance to watch an old rerun of COPS from just the late 80s and early 90s. The police in those episodes show 10 times the patience and 100 times the respect compared to what is regularly shown in the dashcam outrage of the day.

They don't immediately bow up in an aggressive posture when they get on scene, they talk like human beings, they act like their getting paid by the hour and work to calm the situation instead of upping the adrenaline immediately. It's quite striking to watch. And this was when the ghetto was still ghetto, before hipsters and gentrification, when two man detective teams made their own collars in the hood with nary a SWAT to be found.

Blogger RobertW January 14, 2014 8:21 PM  

Actually the police have declared war on all of us. Well after this, the psychopaths in the police ranks - who seem to be growing in numbers - now know they have nothing to fear regardless of their behavior.

Anonymous Contemplationist January 14, 2014 8:30 PM  

The point is that even though the 'bad apple' cops are a tiny minority, there are NO ACCOUNTABILITY mechanisms to check their behavior. No one ever gets punished for ridiculous no-knock raids for a bit of pot, shooting dogs, beating people unprovoked etc. And now we know that even blatant murder is escapable.

Blogger tz January 14, 2014 8:35 PM  

It is worse than that. The mentally ill break small laws where they end up in jail and can't handle the structure so they end up being locked up in solitary, and eventually go to prison where things are worse.

Years ago, there were a series of exposes of the terrible treatment - Nelly Bly, Dorothea Dix, and even going into this century before the advent of psychotropic drugs (the movie Titticut Follies).

There used to be compassion for the weak. But what we do in 2014 to the mentally ill is worse than anything since Bedlam.

Perhaps it is better they were shot - euthanized like they did in Germany in the mid-1930s. Since they would have suffered worse if they entered the system.

Just another small, dark, corner of the culture of death in the USA.

Anonymous Jack Amok January 14, 2014 8:40 PM  

You could certainly argue that aggressive, puppy-shooting, expletive-spewing, SWAT-style policing works a lot better than the old methods, in terms of protecting the lives of those who work as police officers.

Alternately, you could say that writing traffic tickets and harrassing homeless people exposes cops to fewer dangers than cleaning up meth rings and other habitual criminal endeavors.

Blogger AMDG January 14, 2014 8:55 PM  

And the intoxicant of authority stays with you even after you retire. Case in point: the recent shooting (and murder) in a Tampa movie theater by a retired police officer over a bag of thrown popcorn. Of course, the press will focus on stand your ground (Trayvon!!!) and completely ignore the fact that the assailant is a retired captain and obviously has mental health issues.

http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/Two-Shot-at-Tampa-Area-Movie-Theater-239963311.html

Anonymous David of One January 14, 2014 9:00 PM  

For those who require more detail ... 33+ minute video included:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/08/kelly-thomas-beating-video_n_1499771.html

Another media report that indicates that Kelly Thomas' father used to be a deput sheriff:

http://ktla.com/2014/01/13/verdict-reached-in-trial-of-ex-officers-in-kelly-thomas-death/#axzz2qQZdQCo5

Caution ... the hospital photo may keep some awake tonight.

Anonymous kh123 January 14, 2014 9:06 PM  

Probably a week after an animated discussion with a cop near the workplace, had heard they were busy chasing a ripped black dude through a coffee shop a stone's throw from the office. Several cops, guns drawn, no one could catch him. Had seen the guy a week previous at the exact same place that matched the description... jogging with his iPad. So a local, probably jaywalked.

About 5 minutes after they lost him, they were all congregated around the fire station across the street, out of breath, guns still on the out.

Anonymous CX January 14, 2014 9:07 PM  

"No and anyone can confirm it if they get a chance to watch an old rerun of COPS from just the late 80s and early 90s. The police in those episodes show 10 times the patience and 100 times the respect compared to what is regularly shown in the dashcam outrage of the day."

Well, I refer to Huckleberry's quote above:

"The city of Rialto, after numerous complaints, mandated that every officer be fitted with a camera and audio recording unit for patrol.
Reports of abuse, violence and harassment dropped 88% in a year"

While I'm sure things have gotten worse since then, COPS is a poor example. These guys were going into situations well-aware of not only the recording but that their actions would be on national TV (and we all know how real reality TV is!).

Of course, the producers surely did their homework before choosing departments/officers, a process during which any Ramoses and Cicinellis would have been weeded out, and any filmed Ramos/Cicinelli-like behavior clipped out in the editing room due to some contract I imagine they must have had with the departments.

Blogger AMDG January 14, 2014 9:43 PM  

CX:

Exactly. And Cops producers had an incentive to edit out out unflattering depictions of the police because the show required the cooperation of police departments. Very seldom did the program show police using foul language, abuse or intimidation. It was always the police as white knights with the crooks cranked on meth and stumbling down Main St. half-naked.

Anonymous Hunsdon January 14, 2014 9:56 PM  

CX said: Of course, the producers surely did their homework before choosing departments/officers, a process during which any Ramoses and Cicinellis would have been weeded out, and any filmed Ramos/Cicinelli-like behavior clipped out in the editing room due to some contract I imagine they must have had with the departments.

Hunsdon said: I'm also sure that the departments in question had a good long think about just which officers the film crew accompanied. It's like "Battleground: Afghanistan." Ben Middendorf was a shit-hot CO, and it showed. I'm sure it's just coinkidink that he's the guy they were filming. (remember Truman's quote that the Corps had a better PR machine than Stalin.)

Anonymous Godfrey January 14, 2014 10:07 PM  

The bankers get bailed out at your expense and you get beat to death by the cops for J-walking. THIS is Amerika.

Anonymous Mr. Stubby January 14, 2014 10:12 PM  

Having a "large heart" does not mean what some think it means. There were no drugs or alcohol in his system. The "enlarged heart" was due to the fluids being pumped into him trying to save his life... which in fact was not the cause of his death.

Anyhow, KFI AM 640 did a pretty good job of covering the trial:

http://www.kfiam640.com/search/Kelly%20Thomas%20Trial

Anonymous Godfrey January 14, 2014 10:30 PM  

MF Global "loses" $1.2 billion of customer money. Jon Corzine walks away scot free.

You?... well the cops beat you to death for not wearing a seatbelt.

Anonymous Steve Canyon January 14, 2014 10:47 PM  

Would using civil "wrongful death" litigation personally against the officers involved be worth it, maybe even considered "Black Knighting"?

Anonymous Mr. Stubby January 14, 2014 10:52 PM  

Contemplationist January 14, 2014 8:30 PM

The point is that even though the 'bad apple' cops are a tiny minority, there are NO ACCOUNTABILITY mechanisms to check their behavior.


Bullshit.

And... bullshit.

What about all those good cops?

Huh?

What?

Good cops?

Groupthink?

Anonymous realmatt January 14, 2014 11:13 PM  

Would using civil "wrongful death" litigation personally against the officers involved be worth it, maybe even considered "Black Knighting"?

No it would be a waste of time. Anything other than going to their homes and slaughtering them would be a waste of time.

Anonymous Truth January 14, 2014 11:21 PM  

About 1.5% of people report the use of force or threat of force. 75% of those feel the force was excessive. Which means about 1.1% of interactions ended in excessive force ASSUMING that all of the victims were being honest. Only 19% of those who experienced force from the police reported being injured. That means about 0.3% of incidents have ended with a cop injuring a suspect. Again, that assumes honesty on behalf of the suspects. So at 3 out of 1000 we're not exactly dealing with an epidemic of police brutality. And that number is likely higher than actual numbers.

Source is http://www.bjs.gov/ I expect you all to say how bias and unreliable this data is because it doesn't fit your warped view.

Anonymous ZhukovG January 14, 2014 11:22 PM  

If 'Good Cops' don't police the 'Bad Cops', then there are no 'Good Cops'.

Anonymous kh123 January 14, 2014 11:38 PM  

"www.bjs.gov"

I didn't know the gov't offered those sorts of services.

Anonymous wEz January 14, 2014 11:41 PM  

Thought this thread was gonna be about papa roach.........carry on.

Anonymous wEz January 14, 2014 11:46 PM  

"bjs.gov"--Lol...so your saying you're satisfied, truth? Gov't sure is expanding their services these days.

Anonymous WinstonWebb January 14, 2014 11:57 PM  

About 1.5% of people report the use of force or threat of force. 75% of those feel the force was excessive. Which means about 1.1% of interactions ended in excessive force ASSUMING that all of the victims were being honest. Only 19% of those who experienced force from the police reported being injured. That means about 0.3% of incidents have ended with a cop injuring a suspect. Again, that assumes honesty on behalf of the suspects. So at 3 out of 1000 we're not exactly dealing with an epidemic of police brutality. And that number is likely higher than actual numbers.

Except those numbers aren't real. They are based on a Census Bureau sample of only 6,241 people. From 1996.

But let's assume that the extrapolation from that sample rings true.
1.5% of people report the use of force or threat of force.
U.S population is 317,473,000.
So that's 4,762,095 incidents.
19% of those who experienced force from the police reported being injured.
That's 904,798 people injured yearly by police via excessive force.
In 2008, state and local law enforcement agencies employed more than 1.1 million persons on a full-time basis (source).
That means every single state and local law enforcement officer in the country was responsible for 0.823 incidents of police brutality a year.

By all means, keep telling us how wonderful cops are. Those bjs stats are terrific for illustrating the point.

Anonymous automatthew January 14, 2014 11:59 PM  

There is no law but common law, and Samuel Colt is his prophet.

Anonymous totallynotautomatthew January 15, 2014 12:06 AM  

"Anything other than going to their homes and slaughtering them would be a waste of time."

Strangers on a Blog

Anonymous Truth January 15, 2014 1:13 AM  

"But let's assume that the extrapolation from that sample rings true.
1.5% of people report the use of force or threat of force.
U.S population is 317,473,000."

You're extrapolating wrong. The way you're doing it assumes that every american citizen has had police contact. Obviously wrong.

Anonymous bob k. mando January 15, 2014 2:23 AM  

Truth January 14, 2014 11:21 PM
Source is http://www.bjs.gov/ I expect you all to say how bias and unreliable this data is because it doesn't fit your warped view.


http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/ascii/ardus05.txt
"Homicides by law enforcement officers made up 55% of all
deaths during arrests by State and local agencies

In each year between 2003 and 2005, homicides accounted for a
majority of all reported arrest-related deaths. During this
period, States reported 1,106 arrest-related homicides which
represented 55% of arrest-related deaths from all causes.
Homicides by law enforcement officers accounted for 1,095
arrest-related deaths, and 11 homicides were committed by
other persons present at the scene
. "



given that i understand the concept of 'justifiable homocide', perhaps you'd like to dig up the number of police officers who were successfully prosecuted for murder for actions between 2003-05?

because, with +1000 'arrest related deaths' you're damn sure not going to convince me that every single one of those was a good shoot.

and, as we see with Kelly Thomas, even in clear cut cases of murder 2 the cops almost NEVER get convicted.

how many of the pigs at Ruby Ridge got convicted for the blatant murder of multiple innocent civilians, women and children? 0

and the .gov paid over $3 mill to make that go away.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_Ridge#Aftermath

0 criminal prosecutions and i don't believe anyone even lost their job. and this was AFTER the Senate subcommittee report characterizing "the rules of engagement as unconstitutional".

that was with a nationwide televised standoff that 'law enforcement' couldn't falsify much in the way of testimony and documentation because everybody could see what went down.



speaking of falsifying and suppressing evidence, listen to this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKgpbC6WmFM
there's actually an interview with the woman who had her 35mm film destroyed but i can't find it now.

the single greatest thing about the Thomas tape? how the pigs kept demanding that he 'comply' with their commands to lay face down and put his hands behind his back AT THE SAME TIME that they where making it impossible for Thomas to obey them by tazing him or mobbing him ( he had a half dozen on him at the end ).

and then i know about this incident -
http://www.wndu.com/archive/headlines/9834111.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuVGqaYH9w0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvI-68nPbyA

seems the original video of the actual incident has been taken down. hmmm, how convenient.

in which a city council member was illegally ordered removed from a meeting by the chairman and the cop took it upon himself to beat the man on the way out.

no charges in that, either.


i've even got a ridiculous po-lice over reaction story of my own, but there was no physical interaction. just two ambulances, half a dozen fire trucks and cops out the ass for a truck sitting beside the road.

Anonymous WatchMen January 15, 2014 2:45 AM  

Lying fucking pig thugs protected by crony corrupt courts and judiciary.

Cops lie to courts, juries, judges, taxpayers, citizens, defendants, in their reports, to each other, and, yes, they lie under oath on the witness stand.

Judges and unions are empathetic to this process within the system.

Simply WWW search, "cops lie". You'll get the telephone book in hits. It is an epidemic in America. Don't use NSA stooge Google for your WWW search...use startpage™ or ixquick™ .

Are there any good LEO (law enforcement officers)? No. The union sheep "good" LEO will NOT "step over" "the blue line" and report their bad LEO "brothers". It is simple logic, then and therefore, that the "good" LEO are bad BY COMPLICITY...and become instant liars.

Rock 'em sock 'em video-game-playing cops these days are a far cry from cops we grew up with. Not that the cops we grew up with weren't Serpico fodder...no angels. I've always disliked and not trusted cops but these days all bets seem to be off with them.

Blue is the colour of borrowed time.

Anonymous Concern Troll, Local 839 January 15, 2014 3:33 AM  

Why do you hate the mentally challenged and homeless, Truth.

Anonymous cherub's revenge January 15, 2014 7:01 AM  

While I'm sure things have gotten worse since then, COPS is a poor example. These guys were going into situations well-aware of not only the recording but that their actions would be on national TV (and we all know how real reality TV is!).

COPS is still airing new episodes. An apples to apples comparison is possible and the same behavioral differences are visible in the show across time periods that we are noticing off it.

Anonymous CX January 15, 2014 8:54 AM  

"COPS is still airing new episodes. An apples to apples comparison is possible and the same behavioral differences are visible in the show across time periods that we are noticing off it."

I didn't know that, thanks for clarifying.

Though that does change my understanding of your comment, I still have to be a stickler and take exception with "no and anyone can confirm it [by watching old COPS]" (now I know you meant to add "vs new COPS").

While I agree you're probably right if you're implying the differences in the show are a reflection of reality, they could also simply be a reflection of changes in what's acceptable for national syndication, or, say, just how much truth about cops society is willing to tolerate. In other words, correlation, not evidence.

Anonymous Aeoli Pera January 15, 2014 10:12 AM  

Wilsey said that Vidal had been subdued until the third officer walked in and the boy became agitated.

That doesn't sound like mental illness. That sounds like extrasensory information, like he could smell psycho radiating from the guy or something.

Gotta admit that'd be adaptive.

Anonymous Aeoli Pera January 15, 2014 10:14 AM  

I've seen weirder. One regular customer of mine claims he can smell your ethnic history, as in "you have a little bit of African in you".

CoInCiDeNcE?!!!??

Anonymous Orlok January 15, 2014 1:29 PM  

While I concur there are plenty of turkeys out there who need to be in prison. Locally there are plenty that are good men and work to make life safer for their fellow men and women. If were going to start judging folk by their profession then what about realtors,lawyers and bankers, professions which make money by driving up the cost of living for others, directly or indirectly. Rightly divide and don't lump all Cops in the Pig category. I am disturbed by the horror of this case and the frequency of others like it, but it's not as near as bad as you make it. Not yet. anyway.

Anonymous liljoe January 15, 2014 4:25 PM  

Disturbing to watch six overweight tax feeders pounding and suffocating this guy to death, ignoring his pleas to stop. Particularly disturbing for me though was the jovial, carefree attitude of the cops after the deed, while the medics cleaned up the mess leaving that sickening pool of blood on the street. I thought "aren't these guys worried at all that they may have just beaten a guy to death in full view of witnesses for nothing, and they may have to face some consequences for what just happened?"
After the jury's verdict, it's clear they were right to be carefree and joking after all. What a disgusting disgraceful finding by the jury; stunning even by today's standards.

Anonymous Porky January 15, 2014 5:50 PM  

Orlok: "While I concur there are plenty of turkeys out there who need to be in prison. Locally there are plenty that are good men and work to make life safer for their fellow men and women."

I think it's a pretty fair bet that not a single cop on that force would have turned in their colleague.

Anonymous bob k. mando January 15, 2014 6:05 PM  

Porky January 15, 2014 5:50 PM
I think it's a pretty fair bet that not a single cop on that force would have turned in their colleague.



and that is the primary problem.

i've met a lot of douchebag patrol cops in my time but the issue of them getting out of hand WOULD NOT BE A PROBLEM ( douchebaggery not being a crime of itself ) if the 'good' cops, prosecutors and judges didn't spend so much time covering for them.

by the time most of these clowns get busted by IA they are nose deep in drug trafficking, protection rackets, etc.

when's the last time you ever heard of an IA bust for criminal acts against a citizen? until something like that white guy getting analized by the hispanic cops down in AZ ( or was it NM? i can never keep those two straight ) makes major news it's all deny, deny, deny. and ever AFTER it makes major news the answer is still usually to deny, deny, deny.

Anonymous Orlok January 16, 2014 6:58 AM  

Well as horrific as this was, it proves that when the media exposes a problem and the people respond, Local changes took place and eliminated the turkeys, God will judge them for sure. The problem starts with apathy and ignorance to the local govt and you get crappy chiefs and good ol boyism and the resultant graft and crime. What is disturbing to me is the partnership with local law enforcement,local government and media with the federal govt in exchange for freebies. Get to know your local guys engage them attend board meetings etc... the answer lies with us the voters electing upstanding citizens. In texas you don't have to be a lawyer or have a law degree to be a Judge.

Anonymous Joe Friday January 19, 2014 10:07 AM  

"i've met a lot of douchebag patrol cops in my time but the issue of them getting out of hand WOULD NOT BE A PROBLEM..."

And for every 'bad cop", there are 10 police officers who take their job seriously and follow the letter of the law.

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